Wixarika News

Historic Wixárika Ceremony, Cerro Quemado, Feb. 6, 2012. Photo: Tracy L. Barnett
03/08/2022

It is that time of year again, when, since time immemorial, the Wixárika people are preparing their offerings. The candles of life, the chaquira gourd bowls, the God’s eyes, the prayer arrows. They are beginning to retrace the arduous journey of their ancestors, carried out every year in sacred reciprocity for the gift of life. 

Fotografía ©Juan Negrín 1980-2022
03/10/2022

On September 22, 2021, six young Wixarika men between the ages of 16 and 32 were “disappeared” from a road that runs along the sinuous border between the western Mexican states of Jalisco and Zacatecas. Relatives and friends confirm that the young men had gone to carry out a traditional deer hunt. Within days, four of the six bodies were found bearing the marks of torture that are all too common in a country that acts as a hub for organized crime serving its northern neighbor’s notorious appetite for drugs.

Bosques de pino en San Sebastián Teponahuaxtlán. Foto: Agustín Castillo.

Pine forests in San Sebastián Teponahuaxtlán. Image courtesy of Agustín Castillo.

03/03/2022

The Sierra Madre Occidental in northwestern Mexico boasts vast forests that are home to Indigenous communities such as the Wixárika people (or Huichols). Across the largest forest reserves in Jalisco, just three communities are spread across an area of more than 400,000 hectares (988,421 acres), equivalent to one-fifth the size of El Salvador. But this natural wealth is not reflected in the residents’ living conditions. Now, several stakeholders are coming together to help change this narrative.

Bosques de pino en San Sebastián Teponahuaxtlán. Foto: Agustín Castillo.

Pine forests in San Sebastián Teponahuaxtlán. Image courtesy of Agustín Castillo.

03/03/2022

The Sierra Madre Occidental in northwestern Mexico boasts vast forests that are home to Indigenous communities such as the Wixárika people (or Huichols). Across the largest forest reserves in Jalisco, just three communities are spread across an area of more than 400,000 hectares (988,421 acres), equivalent to one-fifth the size of El Salvador. But this natural wealth is not reflected in the residents’ living conditions. Now, several stakeholders are coming together to help change this narrative.

Gerardo Ruiz Smith speaking to those who attended the training in Wirikuta.

Regenerative agriculture expert Gerardo Ruiz Smith, right, is passionate about bringing back keystone species like the giant mesquite that the group stood under as he shared stories and expertise. (Diana Negrín photo)

01/12/2022

On the morning of July 31, 2021, a group of 40 people assembled in the hamlet of Las Margaritas in the sacred land of Wirikuta, in the high plateaus of the Chihuahuan Desert of north-central Mexico. Local farmers in cowboy hats and baseball caps gathered alongside young indigenous Wixárika women and men who had come from their communities in the western states of Jalisco and Nayarit. There were also a dozen non-local and foreign attendees who happened to be in Margaritas or who had put down roots and established homes and working relations in the region.

Corn and Marigolds in Tuapurie ~ Photograph ©Diana Negrín 2021

Corn and Marigolds in Tuapurie ~ ©Diana Negrín 2021

11/17/2021

We hope you have all been well and are off to a good start this fall. The rains were generous in the sierras this year and it looks like the harvests of corn, beans and squash will be bountiful, although in some areas it rained so much that some corn and squash rotted. 

 

View or Print: 
Rocío Echevarría ran health centers in remote Wixárika villages for 10 years before founding Casa Huichol. ©Mexico News Daily
11/05/2021

Before nurse Rocio Echevarría founded Casa Huichol in Guadalajara to shelter members of Jalisco’s Wixáritari who had family in the public hospital, there was usually one option available to the hospitalized person’s loved ones.

Wirikuta - Fotografía ©Juaquin Urrutia 2021
09/29/2021

When it rains in the high plateaus of San Luis Potosí, Mexico, the dampened earth releases a scent that showcases its unique biodiversity. 

 

Wirikuta - Fotografía ©Juaquin Urrutia 2021
09/29/2021

When it rains in the high plateaus of San Luis Potosí, Mexico, the dampened earth releases a scent that showcases its unique biodiversity. 

 

Reserva de Wirikuta
07/15/2021

El altiplano potosino y la Sierra de Catorce conforman una región con un valor biocultural, como pocas en el mundo. Ahí está representada la mayor parte de las especies de flora y fauna silvestres de todo el desierto chihuahuense; concentra la biodiversidad de cactáceas más importante en el mundo.

View or Print: